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开源节流 an interesting Chinese idiom I came across this morning.
Kāiyuánjiéliú – Open (income) sources and reduce expenditures.

When I used google translate for the Japanese equivalent of 开源节流, I came across コスト削減.

コストさくげん – Kosuto sakugen – which is not an idiom. More like a phrase that means cost reduction. Which, if you read the post I reblogged, is really what his post was about anyway.

Japanese picture that confirms the phrase コスト削減
Japanese picture that confirms the phrase コスト削減
What are some budgeting idioms or phrases you’ve come across while learning languages?

Finance 4 U and Me

Hi all,

Its the first time I’m posting on my personal finance blog. I grew up with a strong insurance background and got myself certified as with Capital Markets and Financial Advisory Services (CMFAS) Module 5 (Rules and Regulations for Financial Advisory Service) and Module 9 (Life Insurance and Investment-linked Policies), as well as a Certificate in Health Insurance. However, I have not worked as an insurance agent before.

I’ve feel that i’m quite late in terms personal finance, especially in  terms of investing. I’ve read a lot of blogs on investments and I think I should try to pen down some of my personal finance thoughts into a blog. Its also a way for me to improve my writing skills as well. 🙂

Topic for my first post for this blog will be about 开源节流 (broaden sources of income and reduce expenditure)

开源节流 (Broadening income sources and reducing expenditure)

The Chinese idiom 开源节流 translated into…

View original post 430 more words

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learnchineseeveryday

The concept of a daily vocabulary word is not new. There are a plethora of websites that share a Chinese or Japanese character daily. However, Learn Chinese Everyday is one of the few I actually visit fairly regularly.

It has a consistent layout with the character at the top, with 2-3 words that contain the character below the character, and then 2-3 sentences that contain the vocabulary word.

I don’t normally listen to the vocabulary words, but it’s nice that the option to listen to the sentences are there. I like that the sentences have the pinyin on top of the characters, and the other vocabulary is on the side.

AND it’s totally free .

There are also some bloggers on wordpress that have this theme that I also like to look at:
Thinking Thru Languages does one with traditional Chinese characters. He uses bopomofo instead of pinyin, and he also does some words that contain the featured character.

That Japan Addict has a frequent sentence of the day blog. They are good sentences, and useful vocabulary.
 

combined

The spring semester is finally over! Which means…. summer semester has started. I mentioned in an earlier post that I was taking the program’s hardest class in the spring, and they weren’t kidding! This semester is looking to be really fun, though!

I was on a tangent earlier this week, I found a delicious looking recipe when I tried to use google translate for the ingredients. When it got to the meat part it said “beef peach,” I was like, “uh huh.” and tried to find a beef chart for Japanese. Halfway through translating the Japanese beef chart, I found an alternative one where almost none of the labels were the same as the one I had been using >.< . This being said, I would like to issue a disclaimer: I am not an expert in beef parts, and there are probably many ways of saying the different cuts of beef in all three languages. I have listed the different cuts in the chart below.

English 汉字 拼音 日本語 kana romaji
neck 颈部肉 Jǐng bù ròu ネック nekku
Chuck 脖肉 Bó ròu 肩ロース かたロース Kata rousu
Highrib 上脑 Shàng nǎo リブロース riburousu
sparerib 常骨腹肉 Cháng gǔ fù ròu
Shoulder 肩肉 Jiān ròu かた kata
Point End Brisket 前胸肉 Qián xiōng ròu 肩パラ かたぱら katapara
Navel End Brisket 后胸肉 Hòu xiōng ròu ともパラ tomopara
Shinleg 腱子肉 Jiànzi ròu すね sune
Ribeye 眼肉 Yǎn ròu
Striploin 外脊
Wài jí
セーロイン seiroin
Fillet 里脊 Lǐjí フィレ fuire
Rump 臀肉 Tún ròu ランプ ranpu
Topside 米龙 Mǐ lóng 外もも そともも Soto momo
Thickflank 和尚头 Héshangtóu 内もも うちもも Uchimomo
Silverside 黄瓜条 Huángguā tiáo しんたま shintama

English Cuts

Chinese Cuts

Japanese Cuts

I think that one of the most important aspects of language learning is simply organizing yourself, and keeping track of the words that have been learned.

I like physical flashcards, but I’m always afraid that I’m going to lose a word! It is also impractical after learning a few hundred words of a foreign language.

I have tried some free online flashcards, but the ones that I like the best are from BKYI.com. BYKI stands for Before You Know It. The flashcard system that they use tests users on several different levels (review, recognize, know, produce, own) it give you the ones that you got wrong more often then the ones you get right. I also find it very motivational that when you clear a level it plays victory music!

The company offers BYKI lite, which is fully functional with 90+ lists, the only feature disabled is the ability to add your own stack of flashcards until you’ve purchased it. I like the premade stacks, because they are organized by topic! It’s a great free product for beginners, and definitely worth it to buy it once you are at an intermediate to advanced level.

I would like to ask how other language learners are keeping track of their words. Do you use an electronic flashcard system? excel spreadsheet? a diary?

Here is another word that is practically the same in Chinese and Japanese:

Simplified Chinese: 可爱 Kě’ài (keh-eye)

Tradistional Chinese: 可愛 Kě’ài (keh-eye)

Japanese: 可愛い kawaii (kah-why-E)

可 is a very common hanzi used in Chinese, it means ‘able to/can’ so cute is ‘can love’

好可爱! Hǎo kě’ài! (How-keh-eye)  = very cute in Chinese

很可爱!Hěn kě’ài (hen-keh-eye) = very cute in Chinese

可愛いすぎる! kawaiisugiru (kah-why-E-sue-gi (like the taekwando uniform) – ruh) = too cute! – In Japanese.

 

I came across this tool called Praat about 6 years ago when I was taking a linguistics course in college. 

I find it to be a very useful, and totally free, language learning tool. Especially for learning Chinese tones.

Once it is downloaded and install, all you have to do are the following steps:

1) Go to the “Praat Objects” window, it one of the default windows that opens, and it’s the one that isn’t pink.

2. Press ctr+r

3. Near the bottom of the screen there is a button that says ‘record’, prepare what you want to say and when you press record it will start to record right away.

4. press stop, if you aren’t happy with the recording, just press record again. If you are happy, give it a name and click the button that says ‘save to list and close’

5. Your recording will show up on the left hand side. click on it, and then click on ‘view & edit’

6. This opens up a chart. See the bottom one that has a blue line? That blue line is your pitch (tone.) Your tone should look something like the tone charts that are available online.

Here’s a link to a much better written overview of Praat, one with pictures!

http://www.sinosplice.com/life/archives/2008/01/21/seeing-the-tones-of-mandarin-chinese-with-praat

I just feel that this language learning tool just can’t get enough attention!

It may be more manual than paying a $100+ for a piece of software to analyze it for me, but it is free, and does exactly what I need it to do, and it is great for self-study!

This is where you can get Praat from:

http://praat.en.softonic.com/download